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a Vegan in Sarawak – island of Borneo

Sarawak’s food is just amazing, and the only problem you will have being a vegan is not to gain 10kg 🙂

Kuching 

🌱Sin Wei Tong cafe – has a vegetarian stall, great food around 5RM per dish. some dishes have egg but can request without.

🌱Shun son yen – vegetarian restaurant  by kilo, with delicious food and fresh juices I paid around 15RM for my meal. Make sure you go early to have all the option still available because the food goes quickly. You can try a bit of everything.

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🌱 water front –  there are food stalls and restaurants that have great vegan options.

🌱Zhen Xiang Zhai, delicious food and a good place to try the Sarawak laksa, they close at 3pm. A meal with drinks will cost around 15RM can can choose from the buffet or order off their menu.

🌱open marker – lovelly local place to explore.

🌱Food fair, at the time you are visiting Kuching check if they have a food fair, they have all kinds of food, but be prepared for a crowded place.

Bau

🌱Bau food court– One of the food stalls serves exclusively great vegan food but other stall still have a few options, have a look and ask around.

Other food in the region

💚Seri Muka – Malaysian sweet with rice with pandas leavesimg_1804

💚Steamed Buns –  easily find any food markets and street stalls. They have vegetarian fillings like – sweet been past,  Kaya, Pandan or black sesame paste.

💚Kendal, dessert made with coconut milk, green jelly noodles (rice flour)

💚ABC, made out of shaved ice and a variety of ingredients such as red beans, fruit, sweet corn, grass jelly, etc..

💚Ondeh-Ondeh, glutinous rice flour dumplings filled with ‘gula Melaka’

💚Sticky coconut rice with palm sugar and mango

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💚Fruit and Vegetables, don’t miss it …

💚Other treats

photography – all rights reserved – Ana Rocha

A taste of Vegan Thailand, testimony and tips

15I have been in Thailand twice, and visited the country from north to south, east to west and several islands from both seas. Thailand was the firsts country I visited in Southeast Asia and since then felt in love for that part of the globe.

If you are planning to travel there, be prepared to be astonished with its exotic, luxurious and unspoiled natural areas, colourful places, interesting temples, nice, smily and laid-back people, great weather, unbelievable beaches, maniac drivers, and at last but not the least THE FOOD….

From my personal experience, I need to say that’s fairly easy to have a vegan/vegetarian diet in Thailand. Even when you adventure yourself out of the big cities and you go to places that haven’t seen many Foreigners.

I found that being vegan in Thailand is often deeply respected as Thailand is a predominately Buddhist country.  There is a big prevalence of soy products, like milk and tofu, and traditionally Thai food doesn’t contain dairy, this includes desserts 🙂 so your main concern will mainly involve the use of eggs.

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Fruit stands, fresh markets, night markets and street stalls are very abundant. You will  have so many vegan options to choose from, that looks like heaven. All my meals included fresh veggies, fruit (so much fruit),  rice or rice noodles, juices and Coconut Water and may I say fruit again 🙂

The fruit is just amazing, you definitely need to try Mango, Mangosteen, Rambutan, Pineapple, dragon fruit, Custard Apple, Langsat, Longan, watermelon and Coconut.

The fruit is so delicious that I just couldn’t have enough of it… and you will understand why…

The only problem is what they cook with. They tend to use  fish sauce, oyster sauce, and shrimp paste a lot, so be careful, prepared and relaxed knowing that most of the times communication is not the best, so make sure you explain that you are vegan/vegetarian and you don’t consume shrimp paste (gapi), oyster sauce (sot hoi naag rom), and fish sauce (nam bplaa).  In some odd occasions I even needed to add that I don’t eat chicken too 😀

If you can’t communicate your needs and you’re feeling uncomfortable just politely decline and move on to another location. you will see that everyone will smile and be kind to you. I like to eat in the street stalls and markets, from my experience people is really nice and will try to do something for you even if is not in their “menu” but be prepared to be persuaded to have their normal dish because they think what you are asking is not going to be delicious 🙂 Try not to be to picky and expect them to cook using the same pans where they did the chicken, fish and shrimps.

jclassrestaurant_thumb4I found that the easiest way  is to  say that you follow a jay diet, which translates as strict vegan, but with no garlic and onions. So you can look for the national sign : a bright yellow flag with “Jay” (เจ) written in red, looks like a 17. You can find this sign almost everywhere from restaurants, food stalls or supermarket packages. The restaurants are not to expensive and the food is great.

I found that looking for Taoist temples which have also restaurants is great as well, they are vegan, the price is usually low and they use lot of really delicious textured vegetable.

It’s also good to know that Thailand hosts a great annual national vegetarian festival called teet-sa-kan kin jay, so you can always try to travel during those dates  (9th lunar month of the Chinese calendar) you will not regret.

Happy Cow is a very useful tool to find restaurants.

photography – all rights reserved – Ana Rocha

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Bali – Indonesia

Sofia Fernandes, is a 22 years old Portuguese women, that works in Cambridge in the tourism area. Sofia is very easy-going and sociable person that enjoys spending time with her friends, travel and do exercise. Last month she did her first solo travel to Bali – Indonesia. Have a read, and feel free to leave any comments and questions.

“Traveling solo was a life changing experience.

New cultures, new people, different costumes and food, you find yourself at home because everyone is so friendly.

Mainly, I consider it’s quite easy to find vegetarian options. They serve the typical fried rice or noodles with vegetables that is actually quite tasty. It usually comes with a fried egg on top, so if you are vegan, just ditch the egg. They have a vast selection of fresh juices that you can order for breakfast, so sweet, refreshing and all natural. My favourite was the watermelon juice that we got as a welcome drink in one of the places we stayed in. The locals are so welcoming and genuine, definitely fell in love with the people, always willing to help with a smile on their face. Since it’s a very poor country, they normally grow their own food, obviously everything is organic and tastier. We had the amazing chance to try home cooked food by one Balinese family and it was incredible. They offered a buffet with a lot of vegetarian options including tempeh and tofu so you wouldn’t miss out. They had the famous Bakwan Jagun which is basically corn fritter served with rice and chilli sauce, my favourite – Keripik tempeh pedas – thinly sliced tempeh, fried, and doused in spicy, sweet sauce and much more. However, they mainly eat pork and chicken. Kuta is probably the easiest place to eat because it offers a lot of different restaurants with different kind of food, it’s more western since it’s a very touristic place. I definitely recommend visiting, it’s a piece of heaven with a lot of healthy options!!”

 

photography – all rights reserved – Sofia Fernandes